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    Agreed. This method is fine but I always find myself messing up with whitespaces and punctuation

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    A very enjoyable Kata, Thanks for putting it together.

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    I have the same problem. I think the answer should be "false"

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    This comment is hidden because it contains spoiler information about the solution

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    • Python new test framework should be used (Refer this & this for more detail)
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    Ruby transaltion Kumited, please review and approve!

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    Here are coordinates which exist. Does this particular coordinate exist?
    Doesn't matter if they're negative, that's not a special case. Testing for negative would be missing the point of the requirement - being outside the room.

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    Yes indeed, but it's not obvious and I personally think this should be stated in the description since negative indexes usually are correct data in Python.

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    I'm really confused on one of the test cases. (I don't think this is a spoiler because it's just about the test case.) The test case is: (aOR!b)AND(cOR!d)AND(!cOR!dOR!eOR!f)AND(eOR!g)AND(!fORg)AND(bOR!c)AND(cORdOReORf)AND(!aORf)AND(dOR!e)AND(aORbORg)
    I think the feedback says that this test case is supposed to be True/valid (because my program gives the answer False), but I don't understand why.

    As far as I can tell, if a is True, !aORf means f must be True (because !a is False), !fORg means g must be True, eOR!g means e must be True, dOR!e means d must be True, cOR!d means c must be True, and then !cOR!dOR!eOR!f is False because f, e, d, and c are True. So the solution a = True doesn't work.

    If a is False, aOR!b means b must be False (because a is False in aOR!b, so !b must be True and b must be False), and then bOR!c means c must be False, cOR!d means d must be false, dOR!e means e must be False, and eOR!g means g must be False, making aORbORg False.

    Since a cannot be True or False with all the statements evaluating to True, why is this statement valid? I'm clearly missing something here, maybe not even understanding the Kata as a whole, but since I can't even understand the test case, it's really hard to get my program to understand it. Can anyone help me out here?

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    Great kata..thanks :)

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    More tests needed; missing edge cases tests: an empty string, a string where underscore is the only invalid character.
    Random tests needed.

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    I understand if one of values or both in arg cat are negative shoud return 'NoCat'??

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    you need a chair to rest yourself... ;)

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    Ad NoCat: Correct! I've changed the order of NoCat and NoTable so many times that I became "confused" :D

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